Teaching

I have been teaching in a university setting in some form since 2000, when I was a graduate student teaching assistant for the first time. I have been at the University of Windsor since 2005, teaching a wide range of courses in the Political Science department and, in the past, in the multidisciplinary Environmental Studies program. I enjoy teaching, and try to put a lot of care and effort into what I bring into the classroom, always focused on being prepared, enthusiastic, and reflexive. For me, teaching is inextricably tied to research, so if I can’t go into a classroom and explain to students particular concepts, ideas, examples, or methods used in my research and that I rely on to carry out my work, then I should probably rethink how and why I am using them myself. Conversely, teaching is the chance to introduce a new generation of students and scholars to ideas and examples they may not have encountered before, and to help them make connections and bring concepts to life in their own thinking, writing, and engagement with the world. My goal is not to give students information, but rather to help them get to a point where they know how to ask useful, productive questions of their world and of received knowledge, so they can become more politically engaged and socially responsible, and develop the ability to take lessons from the classroom through the rest of their lives.

Below is a list of classes I have taught in my current position, and, for most of them, the most recent syllabus. I have stripped out the specific boilerplate language that my institution requires as much as possible so that what remains are the course descriptions, lists of readings and kinds of assignments I have used, and the academic and intellectual structure of each course. If you have any questions about this material or want to use something from it, please email me and I can talk to you more about it and see what I can provide.

Undergraduate courses
45-120 Space, Place, and Scale: Foundations of Human Geography (Fall 2016 syllabus)
45-160 Introduction to International Relations
45-249 Political Economy of Agriculture and Food (Winter 2016 syllabus)
45-335 Political Geography (Fall 2016 syllabus)
45-356 Theories of International Political Economy (Winter 2014 syllabus)
45-440 Remaking North America: Geog. Perspectives on US-Canada Politics (Fall 2015 syllabus)
45-465 Seminar in Globalization (Fall 2016 syllabus)
58-100 Introduction to Environmental Studies

Graduate courses
45-488/588 Special Topics: Development Challenges in the 21st Century (Winter 2011 syllabus)
45-500 Scope and Approaches in Political Science (Fall 2015 syllabus)
45-530 Politics in the Developed World
45-561 International Relations Theory (Fall 2012 syllabus)